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Frequently Asked Questions

GENERAL
Why Row?
What types of rowing are available at SDRC?

TEAMS AND RACING
How many athletes are in the Junior program?
What schools do rowers come from?
What are the SDRC Junior Teams?
Who races?
What about lightweights?
What is the role of the coxswain?

COST OF SDRC JUNIORS
What is the cost for the High School program?
What is the cost for the middle school program?
Do we need to pay any additional regatta fees?
Are scholarships available?
What is the monthy payment used for?

PROGRAM LOGISTICS
What is the difference between the fall and spring sessions?
What are the practice times?
Are there carpools?
What happens during practices?
What about being late to practice or leaving early?
Can athletes row just in the Fall or Spring?

PARENTS
What is the role of parents?

REGATTAS
When does the high school team have regattas?


GENERAL 

Why row?


There are many reasons to row – from college admissions, to personal development and satisfaction to camaraderie and teamwork. Rowing is a total team experience that completely immerses the athlete like no other sport.

Team Experience
The team experience in rowing is like no other -- athletes form very close friendships and have a lot of fun. They become responsible to their team and help each other develop and perform. Other sports talk about responsibility and teamwork, but in rowing it is the performance of the crew together that counts more than any one individual. Many students find that rowing gives them that social group which they have been searching for!

Personal Development
Rowing is for everyone and will make you stronger, and more focused -- in fact, rowers are the toughest, most determined athletes you will meet! Rowing works all the muscle groups and burns more calories than almost any other sport or exercise. It is a sport that demands endurance, strength and skill. It requires consummate mental toughness and will maximize the potential of any athlete. Overall, rowing gives students a boost in their personal development and prepares them well with good habits for success throughout life.

College Admissions
For parents and students, one of the primary advantages of high school rowing is the benefit of improved college admissions. The application process for the best colleges has become more competitive and selective than ever. Rowing is the fastest growing NCAA sport and many colleges recruit for crew and some even offer scholarships. The overall improvement in admissions for athletes who row is significant and clearly evident in the SDRC Junior Crew program.   Back to Top


What types of rowing are available at SDRC?

SDRC Juniors will row sweep (single oar) and sculling (two oars). Novices will primarily row sweep eights (eight rowers) and fours (four rowers) with a coxswain. They will also experience sculling quads (four rowers) with a coxswain and singles (on their own!) Varsity rowers will only have a coxswain for sweep fours and eights, and may also row sweep pairs (two rowers) and sculling doubles (also two rowers).        Back to Top



TEAMS AND RACING

How many athletes are in the Junior program?

The SDRC Juniors program has a capacity between 100 and 120 high school rowers and up to 30 middle school rowers.  Back to Top

What schools do rowers come from?

SDRC Junior rowers come from many high schools (and now middle schools) all across San Diego county. Each year, we have athletes from about 40 schools!  Back to Top

What are the SDRC Junior Teams?

There are separate Men’s and Women's Junior teams, each split into Varsity and Novice groups, plus a coed Middle School team. The Novice teams are considered entry level and can only have athletes with less than a year of racing experience. Novices can be any grade in high school, provided it is their first year of competitive rowing.

The Varsity teams are for athletes with at least one year of racing experience. Varsity athletes may be returning from a previous year as a novice, varsity rower at SDRC or from any other competitive rowing program. All returning high school rowers will be on a Varsity team.  Back to Top

Who races?

All high school rowers will race at SDRC. Middle school rowers do not race. Novice athletes race against other Novice teams during their first year. Crews and line-ups are selected by coaches at their sole discretion based on a combination of factors, including strength, endurance, technique, motivation and compatibility.  Back to Top

What about lightweights?

There are lightweight categories in most races to give opportunities to smaller athletes: the lightweight cut-off is 150 lbs each for men and 130 lbs for women.   Back to Top

What is the role of the coxswain?

The coxswain (or “cox”) is a key part of the team. All sweep eights and junior fours have a coxswain to steer the boat and encourage the team and shoulder some of the coaching duties.  In races, coxswains can make a significant difference with competitive tactics and feedback to the rowers.

The coxswain position in rowing is a good way for a smaller middle or high school athlete to participate in a competitive sport. Junior coxswains weigh about 110 pounds for women and about 130 pounds for men. While lighter coxes are better, there is a minimum weight below which additional ballast must be carried in USRowing events. Coxswains also need to tell their crews of what to do, so they need to be capable of developing into confident, mature and assertive leaders.  Back to Top


COST OF SDRC JUNIORS

What is the cost for the High School program?

For high school rowers, the cost is $410 per month  Back to Top

What is the cost for the middle school program?

For middle school rowers, the cost is $260 per month  Back to Top

What is the monthly payment used for?

SDRC Juniors dues and initiation fees primarily go to cover the cost of coaching and regattas (competitive events). A portion of the dues and fees are allocated for monthly boathouse dues per rower and equipment maintenance and repairs. Finally, new boats, oars, ergs and launches are expensive and do not last forever. While SDRC has an impressive array of equipment, financial resources rarely match the constant need to provide athletes with the best and newest that we would like.  Back to Top

Do we need to pay any additional regatta fees?

Monthly fees cover regatta fees, hotel and travel to most regattas with the exception of a few that are "pay for play". Head of the Charles and Head of the American will send a small selection of athletes who will pay for the travel themselves. The same is true for participants of qualifying boats in the Youth Nationals.  Back to Top

Are scholarships available?

Needs-based scholarship programs are available to ensure no athletes are denied participation due to financial circumstances.  Back to Top


PROGRAM LOGISTICS
What is the difference between the fall and spring sessions?

Rowing is an annual sport with periodized training and competition. In the fall, rowers focus on a training phase to develop overall aerobic fitness and endurance as well as learning good rowing technique. Fall regattas(races) reflect this training phase with longer distance “Head” races,typically 5,000 m (5K or 3 miles) in length.

In the spring, training shifts to add the development of strength and anaerobic power. Spring regattas reflect this with shorter 2,000 m(2K or 1 mile) sprint races culminating in the Southwest Regionals in Sacramento, to decide who will go to Nationals.  Back to Top

What are the practice times?

Middle School: Monday, Wednesday, Thursday, 4:00-6:00 pm
High School (Novice and Varsity): Monday - Friday, 4:00-6:30 pm and Sat 8:30-11:00 am  Back to Top

Are there carpools?

There is very limited parking at the SDRC boathouse so we encourage parents and athletes to carpool if possible. The team roster is published early in each season to allow parents to see opportunities for kids from the same schools or nearby ZIP codes. Arranging carpools is primarily left to parents to coordinate directly themselves.  Back to Top


What happens during practices?


In addition to taking boats out and rowing on the water, athletes train at practice in a variety of other ways – on rowing machines (ergs), weightlifting, running, and core strengthening and stretching.  Back to Top

Are practices mandatory?

All rowers, especially Varsity, are expected to be present for all practices. Rowers cannot improve unless they attend practices and line-ups in the best boats assume that rowers will be there. This is only respectful of both the other athletes on the team as well as the coaches. Should rowers be unable to make one or more practices, particularly if there is a frequent conflict, the individual athlete must inform the coach in advance.  Back to Top

What about being late to practice or leaving early?

Most practices start with a coach discussion and warm-up in which rowers will want to participate. Once line-ups are set and boats have launched, late rowers will only be able to do a land workout, typically running or erging at the coach’s discretion. For boats with a pre-determined line-up, late rowers will impact the whole team.

Similarly, it is difficult for individual rowers to leave early if the practice is on the water, unless the workout is land training. However, rowers should coordinate potential late arrivals and early departures with their coaches in advance.  Back to Top

Can athletes row just in the Fall or Spring?

We know that some athletes like to participate in other sports or activities. Rowers may row in just the Fall or Spring season however, there may be additional cost and athletes may not be able to receive the same opportunity to develop and compete in the top boats.  Back to Top

PARENTS

What is the role of parents?

Parents are a critical component of a successful program. Detailed descriptions of the role and responsibilities  is included in the SDRC Juniors Red Book. We encourage parents to volunteer and support their athletes, especially in their areas of expertise and experience.  Back to Top

REGATTAS

When does the high school team have regattas?

Regattas are typically held on weekends and typically involve 1-2 days of racing. Some regattas (such as Faultline Faceoff in Oakland or the Southwest Junior Championship Regatta in Sacramento) also involve an extra day for travel. Please see the regatta schedule on the home page for the most up to date info.

 


Boathouse: 1220 El Carmel Place, San Diego, CA 92109 | Mailing address: SDRC Juniors, PO Box 99856, San Diego, CA 92169 | Boathouse Telephone: (858) 488-1893
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